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WSH News

The WSH Council reminds food delivery businesses to prioritise workplace safety and health

17 Jun 2020
Ref No.: 170620 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Grace period of 2 months for mandatory Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) audits upon resumption of workplace operation // Campus Safety and Health: Our Responsibility   17 June 2020, Ref: 2021031   The WSH Council reminds food delivery businesses to prioritise workplace safety and health   As Singapore moves into the post-Circuit Breaker period, the demand for food delivery services continues to increase, largely prompted by an influx of new delivery platforms and delivery services by F&B establishments.   The Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Council urges food delivery businesses to step up efforts to remind their delivery personnel on the importance of keeping themselves safe and healthy at all times. To better safeguard the health of our workforce during this period, food delivery businesses must also educate their delivery personnel on the adoption of Safe Management Measures (SMM).   The safety and health of our workforce remain paramount at all times, and food delivery businesses as well as the delivery personnel must do all they can to prevent all injuries and ill-health while at work.   Make use of WSH training materials   The WSH Council has come up with a set of materials for food delivery businesses to brief and educate their delivery personnel on the importance of WSH, as well as the implementation of SMM. The training materials include pictograms as well as relevant Guidelines.   Take part in our National WSH Campaign quiz to find out which aspects of your health you could be neglecting that can lead to injuries at work. Share your persona at the end of the quiz with your co-workers and friends on Facebook!   Download WSH training materials here. Take the Campaign persona quiz here.

Grace period of 2 months for mandatory Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) audits upon resumption of workplace operation // Campus Safety and Health: Our Responsibility

11 Jun 2020
Ref No.: 110620 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Grace period of 2 months for mandatory Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) audits upon resumption of workplace operation // Campus Safety and Health: Our Responsibility   11 June 2020, Ref: 2021030   Grace period of 2 months for mandatory Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) audits upon resumption of workplace operation   With the phased and controlled resumption of work activities announced by the Multi-Ministry Taskforce, workplaces with mandatory SHMS audits due during the Circuit Breaker period will be allowed to have the audit conducted within 2 months from the resumption of workplace operation. For example, workplaces that resumed operation on 2 June 2020 must conduct the next mandatory SHMS audit by 2 August 2020.   For bizSAFE companies on risk management audit, they can write to the WSH Council for an extension of renewal and it will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.   Campus Safety and Health: Our Responsibility The WSH (Higher Education and Research) Working Group has successfully developed a safety and health e-learning package in May 2020. This 60-minute training will introduce the fundamentals of safety and health to all freshmen from the 11 participating Institutes of Higher Learning.    Students who have successfully completed the programme would be able to:  • Understand causes of accident; • Identify types of hazards on campus; • Adopt Look-Think-Do to prevent accidents; and • Respond to emergencies.   Through the use of contextualised, interactive and bite-sized learning, students are able to relate to and appreciate the theme of campus safety and health. The key features of this e-learning package include: • Self-paced learning anytime, anywhere;  • Learning checkpoints; • Real-life scenarios; and • Randomised test questions View the introduction video here. More information can be obtained from the safety departments of the respective Institutes of Higher Learning.

Accident Notification: Worker fell off parapet wall

08 Jun 2020
Ref No.: 080620 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Notification: Worker fell off parapet wall   8 June 2020, Ref: 2021029   Accident Notification: Worker fell off parapet wall   On 2 June 2020, two workers were carrying out repair works on a sawdust extractor that was positioned next to a parapet wall. To reach the side of the extractor, one of the workers stood on the parapet wall, lost his footing and fell 12 metres to the ground. The worker was conveyed to the hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.     The Ministry of Manpower has commenced investigations into the accident.   Employers, principals and contractors in similar work situations are advised to put in place the necessary measures to protect workers from fall from height risks. A suitable work method must be established for the repair works to be carried out safely without the need to work at height next to a parapet wall, e.g. by moving the extractor to a safe work location. Always check that workers are in a position that is not exposed to risks before starting work. Relevant stakeholders including occupiers should consider the installation of parapet wall railings to deter and prevent workers from climbing and going over the wall.   Beyond implementing Safe Management Measures to prevent and/or contain the spread of COVID-19, companies are reminded to prioritise workplace safety and health, and ensure that safe work practices and risk control measures are effectively implemented as work activities resume. Click here for more information on how to ensure a safe working environment.   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 4 June 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.  

Accident Advisory: Worker fell from aircraft during maintenance work

05 Jun 2020
Ref No.: 050620 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Advisory: Worker fell from aircraft during maintenance work   05 June 2020, Ref: 2021028   Accident Advisory: Worker fell from aircraft during maintenance work Ref: 1920085 WSH Alert Accident Notification dated 7 January 2020   On 22 December 2019, a worker overseeing maintenance works on an aircraft fell from the door of the aircraft to the ground. The worker was sent to the hospital where he subsequently succumbed to his injuries on 3 January 2020.   Figure 1: Re-enactment of the accident scene using a similar aircraft.   Recommendations   Persons in control of similar workplaces and work activities such as occupiers, principals and employers are advised to consider the following risk control measures to prevent similar accidents:   Safe access to and egress from the aircraft • Employers are to provide a safe means for workers to get to and move    around the designated work area. Access equipment (e.g. platform    staircase) should be of suitable height and fitted with the necessary    guard railing to prevent falls. • The selected access equipment should consider the tools and/or    equipment that workers are expected to carry and the possible    environmental conditions that may be encountered. For example, should    there be a need to work at night, the provision of adequate workplace    illumination is important. The design of the accessway should also account    for exposure to the weather as rain will make surfaces slippery and strong    winds can cause one to lose balance.   Workplace security and access control  • Occupiers should control access and allow entry only to authorised    persons as there may be risk of falling from height within the work    area which unauthorised persons may not be aware of.   Permit-to-Work (PTW) for hazardous work at height situation • In all workplaces specified as factories, a PTW is a mandatory requirement for    work at height situations where a person could fall from a height of more than    3 metres. The PTW should include the following information and checks    (non-exhaustive) to verify that conditions are safe before allowing the work    to proceed:        - Particulars of the personnel assigned to the work.        - Description and location of the equipment or installation.        - Description of the work to be carried out.        - Measures taken to ensure that the equipment or installation has been           made safe.        - Fall prevention measures such as the use of suitably guarded work           platform and a personal fall arrest system.   Hazard communication and Safe Work Procedure (SWP) • Brief workers on the possible risks associated with the task prior to    work commencement. Ensure that workers are familiar with the SWP, the    risk controls that are in place, and any additional precautionary measures that    they should take. • If the access equipment must be shared by different teams, then this must be    carefully planned for and the work must be coordinated to ensure that the    access equipment is not shifted without the consent of the team that is using    them.   Worker supervision • Provide on-site supervision to ensure that the SWP is strictly adhered to. • Consider deploying closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras for continuous    monitoring of remote areas.   Personal Protective Equipment • Provide each worker with anti-slip safety footwear. • Provide each worker with a refective vest so that the worker's presence at the    designated work area is clearly visible.   Worker health • Conduct a pre-work health check at the start of each work shift to verify each    worker’s fitness to work. • Workers who are not feeling well should not be placed on the job or shift.   Risk Assessment   Conduct a holistic Risk Assessment (RA) to identify possible hazards associated with the work activity. The RA should cover all foreseeable risks but not limited to the following areas:   • Slip and fall hazards e.g. from access equipment; • Work environment e.g. working at night; and • Work organisation e.g. long working hours.   Further Information   1. Workplace Safety and Health Act 2. Workplace Safety and Health (Risk Management) Regulations 3. Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations 4. Workplace Safety and Health (Work at Heights) Regulations 2013 5. Code of Practice on Workplace Safety and Health Risk Management 6. Code of Practice for Working Safely at Heights 7. SS 531: Code of Practice for Lighting of Work Places Part 2: Outdoor 8. WSH Guidelines on Anchorage, Lifelines and Temporary Edge Protection Systems 9. WSH Guidelines on Personal Protective Equipment for Work at Heights 10. WSH Guidelines on Fatigue Management 11. WSH Council’s Work at Heights Toolkit for Supervisors 12. WSH Council’s Case Studies on Accidents Involving Work at Heights 13. Basic Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Rules for Work at Heights 14. WSH Council’s Activity Based Checklist for Working Safely on Heights   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 25 March 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

Accident Notification: Worker caught between lorry and forklift

01 Jun 2020
Ref No.: 010620 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Notification: Worker caught between lorry and forklift   1 June 2020, Ref: 2021026   Accident Notification: Worker caught between lorry and forklift   On 28 May 2020, a worker was within his forklift, attempting to open the door of a lorry that was beside his forklift, when the forklift suddenly reversed, trapping the worker between the door of the lorry and the chassis of the forklift. The injured worker was conveyed to the hospital where he eventually succumbed to his injuries.    The Ministry of Manpower has commenced investigations into the accident.   Employers and principals are advised to put in place the necessary risk controls to protect workers from injury during forklift operations. To prevent accidental movement of the forklift, the safe work procedure must require forklift operators to engage the parking brake and switch off the engine once the forklift is parked. The use of seat sensing technology may be used to ensure that the forklift can be operated only if the operator is seated. Forklift operators must stay within the forklift cage with seat belts fastened so long as the engine is running.   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 1 June 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying any liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

Accident Advisory: Worker fatally injured by machine door

01 Jun 2020
Ref No.: 010620 (2) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Advisory: Worker fatally injured by machine door   01 June 2020, Ref: 2021025   Accident Advisory: Worker fatally injured by machine door Ref: 1920103 WSH Alert Accident Notification dated 26 February 2020   On 24 February 2020, two workers were on a work platform carrying out maintenance works on a scrap metal machine when the overhead door closed downwards and struck both of them. One worker was fatally pinned between the door and the work platform. The other worker sustained minor injuries.   Figure 1: Overview of the scrap metal machine.   Figure 2: Close-up of the accident location.   Recommendations   Stakeholders such as occupiers, employers, principals and contractors in control of similar workplaces and work activities are advised to consider the following risk control measures to prevent similar accidents:   Safer machine by design • Machines should be designed and built in such a way that it can perform the    intended function without the need to put workers at risk of injury during    operations and maintenance. • Machines with moving parts must be designed such that workers are protected    through machine guards or other protective devices. Should the workers be    required to work below or near a movable part of the machine (the overhead    door in this case), ensure that the movable part is properly secured (e.g. using    safety retaining pins that can hold the door in place) to prevent accidental    movement. As an added measure, the use of presence sensors may be used to    stop door movement once a person is detected in the vicinity.   Energy lock-out and tag-out • Always isolate, disconnect or discharge all hazardous energy sources (whether   electrical, mechanical, pneumatic or hydraulic) and place the machine on lock-out   and tag-out (LOTO) prior to maintenance or repair works. This is to prevent   accidental machine activation and ensure that machine parts cannot move while   the works are in progress. • Incorporate the LOTO procedure into safe work procedures so that workers are    guided on how they can carry out the work safely. Refer to SS 571: 2011 Code    of Practice for Energy Lockout and Tagout for more information on LOTO    requirements and procedures.   Machine declaration of conformity • Ensure that the machine manufacturer or supplier has provided a “Declaration    of Conformity”. A declaration of conformity is a formal declaration by a    manufacturer or supplier that the machine meets all local safety requirements    and relevant international standards. • A declaration of conformity typically includes (non-exhaustive):      - name and address of the manufacturer (or, where appropriate, the         authorised representative);      - information on machine model, type and serial number;      - applicable safety requirements and standards that the machine conforms         to; and      - identity and signature of the person empowered to draw up a declaration on         behalf of the manufacturer (or the authorised representative).   Worker training • Ensure that workers are adequately trained and competent in machine operation   and maintenance prior to assigning work. The training should cover hazard   identification and the WSH aspects of the task at hand. • Machine operators should be trained to:      - understand the purpose of the energy lock-out and tagout;      - recognise when lock-out activities are in progress; and      - understand the importance of not tampering with the lock-out devices. • Authorised personnel carrying out servicing and maintenance should be trained to:      - identify hazardous energy sources;      - carry out the LOTO procedure; and      - safely apply (and remove) energy-isolating and lock-out devices. • Where applicable, buyers of machineries should work closely with the    machine manufacturer or supplier to provide user training sessions for    machine operators and in-house maintenance personnel. • Remind workers on the hazards and risks of working with the specific machine,    for example, during daily toolbox meetings or prior to work commencement.   Worker communication • Establish a suitable mode of communication (e.g. walkie-talkie) for situations    where more than one worker is required to work on a machine. This is to    facilitate enhanced situational awareness. This is especially critical for large    machines when workers may not have line-of-sight to each other when working    on the same machine.   Risk Assessment   Conduct a thorough Risk Assessment (RA) for all work activities to manage any foreseeable risk that may arise when working with machinery. The RA should cover, but not limited to, the following areas:   • The need for workers to interact with a movable part of the machine; • The need for machine guarding or protective devices for movable machine parts; and • Adequacy of supervision during operation and maintenance of machine.   Further Information   1. Workplace Safety and Health Act 2. Workplace Safety and Health (Risk Management) Regulations  3. Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations 4. SS 537: Part 1: 2008 – Code of Practice for Safe Use of Machinery Part 1:     General Requirements  5. SS 571: 2011 – Code of Practice for Energy Lockout and Tagout  6. ISO 14120: 2015 Safety of Machinery – Guards – General Requirements for the     Design and Construction of Fixed and Movable Guards 7. ISO 14119: 2013 Safety of Machinery – Interlocking Devices associated with     Guards – Principles for Design and Selection 8. Workplace Safety and Health Guidelines on Safe use of Machinery 9. WSH Council’s Case Studies for Metalworking Industry  10. WSH Council’s Activity Based Checklist on Working Safely with Machines  11. WSH Council’s 6 Basic Workplace Safety and Health Rules for Working with       Machines 12. WSH Council’s Article Protect Against Machine Accidents 13. WSH Council’s Toolbox Meeting Kit 14. UK Health and Safety Executive’s Providing and Using Work Equipment       Safely (INDG291 rev1) 15. Waste Industry Safety and Health (WISH) Forum Information Document       – Practical Advice on Lock-off Recycling/Recovery Machinery   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 1 April 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying any liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

National WSH Campaign resources and quiz on improving employees’ health at work

29 May 2020
Ref No.: 290520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, National WSH Campaign resources and quiz on improving employees’ health at work   29 May 2020, Ref: 2021125   National WSH Campaign resources and quiz on improving employees’ health at work   Calling upon all in the Industry to take time to take care of their safety and health, the WSH Council has created a?microsite for this year’s National WSH Campaign with information catered for both employers and employees. Employees are encouraged to set aside time to care for their health so that they can be safe and productive at work; while employers are advised to demonstrate care for their employees, which in turn helps create a healthy workforce.   Download the Workplace Safety and Health Kits   Companies can make use of the Employer’s Kit to take steps in improving their employees’ health at work and adopt approaches in enhancing their well-being through disease and lifestyle management. Download the Care Kit for Employees which comprises educational health messages, suggested actions, and other useful resources. Companies can share the Care Kit with employees to kick-start their journey to improving and managing their health at work.     Visit the Campaign microsite here. Download the Care Kit for Employees here and the Employer’s Kit here.       Take the persona quiz Companies can encourage their employees to take the persona quiz to learn more about how healthy they are at work. Employees can share their personas with co-workers and get them to join in the fun. The quiz comes with health tips and serves as a reminder to improve one’s health and lifestyle habits to prevent injuries at work.     Take the persona quiz here.   Get the latest updates and take part in Campaign activities   Employers and employees can sign up on the microsite to receive more information about the Campaign, and attend upcoming e-workshops on various health topics.  

The WSH Council reminds companies to prioritise workplace safety and health as work activities resume

28 May 2020
Ref No.: 280520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, The WSH Council reminds companies to prioritise workplace safety and health as work activities resume   28 May 2020, Ref: 2021124   The WSH Council reminds companies to prioritise workplace safety and health as work activities resume   As announced by the Multi-Ministry Taskforce, the Circuit Breaker measures will be gradually eased from 2 June 2020 onwards and businesses will be allowed to resume activities in phases. As many project schedules have been delayed by a month or more, some companies may try to make up for lost time by rushing site operations once selected work activities (e.g. construction activities) are allowed to resume. Companies are reminded not to rush their operations to manage their project delays.   Employers, principals, and persons at work must ensure that established workplace safety and health (WSH) procedures and maintenance regime are not compromised for the sake of work progress. Companies must put in place the necessary measures to ensure all work are carried out safely, including Safe Management Measures (SMM) as per Ministry of Manpower’s requirements.     The safety and health of our workforce remains paramount at all times, and companies must do all they can to protect workers from injuries, accidents and illnesses while at work.   Adopt these guidelines to ensure safe working environment for workers As work resumes, all employers and principals are reminded to: • deploy only workers who are feeling well, fit for work and competent for the task; • check that all vehicles, machinery, equipment and tools to be used have    undergone routine maintenance, inspected to be in good working condition and    ready for use; • review the risk assessment for each work activity/process and account for the    impact of reduced manpower, if any; • confirm that risk controls are in place and effectively implemented; • ensure Safe Work Procedures (SWPs) for any reduced manpower scenario have    been established; • provide the necessary on-site supervision to ensure SWPs are strictly adhered to; • conduct toolbox briefings to ensure that workers are aware of the SWPs and    on-site risk controls prior to starting work; • put in place measures to protect workers from fatigue, heat stress and ergonomic    risks; and • implement SMM to provide a safe working environment and minimise risks of    further COVID-19 outbreaks.   Make use of WSH training materials Employers and principals can tap into a series of pictorial training slides to address common workplace hazards such as machinery safety, fall from height, and slips, trips and falls. They can download the WSH training slides, which include videos and other useful resources. The Council has also produced a safe distancing poster to facilitate training for workers.   Download the WSH Training Slides here. Download the WSH Guidelines on Fatigue Management here. Download the infographic produced by the Ministry Of Manpower and Ministry of Trade and Industry on the 6 mandatory steps on SMM at workplaces for employers when businesses reopen here.   Workshops    WSH Seminar Series: Supporting WSH 2028 through Research   Find out how technology can play an impactful part to further strengthen WSH in future workspaces in the built environment. This seminar will be conducted via Zoom. Topic:   Technology-Enabled WSH Date:    19 June 2020 (Friday) Time:    2pm - 3.30pm Get more information here.

Accident Advisory: Worker struck by ejected assembly component

27 May 2020
Ref No.: 270520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Advisory: Worker struck by ejected assembly component   27 May 2020, Ref: 2021122   Accident Advisory: Worker struck by ejected assembly component Ref: 1920114 WSH Alert Accident Notification dated 24 March 2020   On 23 March 2020, a worker was using a hydraulic press machine to dismantle an engineering component when he was struck by a part of the assembly. He was conveyed to the hospital where he passed away.   Figure 1: Hydraulic Press Machine.   Figure 2: Closeup of assembly after the accident.   Recommendations   Stakeholders such as occupiers, employers and principals in control of similar workplaces and work activities are advised to consider the following risk control measures to prevent similar accidents:   Safer machine by design • When conducting Risk Assessment (RA) for the use of press machines, the    hazard of component ejection during operation should be identified, where    applicable. As the severity of component ejection is “Major” or    “Catastrophic”, consideration must first be given to hazard elimination. This    may be achieved by redesigning its ancillary tools and components in such    away that the hazard of component ejection is eliminated. • In the event the risk of component ejection cannot be eliminated, machine    guarding that is designed to withstand the impact force of the ejected component    must be installed. Such guarding may need to be custom-built for the machine    and must be of sufficient thickness and material strength to prevent the    ejected component from punching through.   Safe Work Procedures (SWPs) • Establish and implement SWPs for the (i) selection and proper use of tools, and   (ii) safe method for component securing, dismantling and assembly. • Allow only authorised and competent workers, who have been trained on the SWP,    to operate the machine. • Provide adequate supervision to ensure adherence to the SWP.   Worker training • Ensure that workers are adequately trained for the specific make and model of    the press machine prior to assigning work. The training should include    educating workers on the hazards posed by the machine and the controls that    are in place to minimise risk of accident. • Where applicable, machinery buyers should work closely with the machine    manufacturer and/or supplier to provide customised end-user training    sessions, especially for machine operators and in-house machine    maintenance personnel. • Stakeholders, including employers and principals, must ensure safety and    health information is conveyed to workers. Such information (that must be    made available by manufacturers and suppliers of such machinery) includes    (i) precautions to be taken for the proper use and maintenance of the machine,    (ii) health hazards associated with the machinery, and (iii) results of any tests    that are relevant to the safe use of the machine.   Risk Assessment   Conduct a thorough Risk Assessment for all work activities to manage any foreseeable risk that may arise when working with machinery. The RA should cover, but not limited to, the following areas:   • How to get a better understanding of the WSH risk(s) posed by the machine, the    risk controls put in place by the manufacturer, and the risks that remain prior    to machine purchase/acquisition. • Possibility of components and/or materials being ejected from the machine while    it is in operation. • Safe position for machine operators to adopt prior to activating the machine. • Adequacy of the machine guarding in protecting the worker from injury.   Further Information   1. Workplace Safety and Health Act 2. Workplace Safety and Health (Risk Management) Regulations  3. Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations 4. Singapore Standard SS 537: Part 1: 2008 Code of Practice for Safe Use of     Machinery Part 1: General Requirements  5. WSH Guidelines on Managing Safety and Health for SMEs in the Metalworking Industry 6. WSH Guidelines on Safe Use of Machinery  7. WSH Council’s Technical Advisory for Safe Use of Power Presses and Press Brakes 8. WSH Council’s Case Studies for Metalworking Industry  9. WSH Council’s Activity Based Checklist on Working Safely with Machines  10. WSH Council’s 6 Basic Workplace Safety and Health Rules for Working with Machines 11. WSH Council’s Article “Protect Against Machine Accidents” 12. ISO 12100: 2010 Safety of Machinery – General Principles for Design       – Risk Assessment and Risk Reduction 13. ISO 13855: 2010 Safety of Machinery – Positioning of Safeguards with respect       to the Approach Speeds of Parts of the Human Body 14. ISO 14119: 2013 Safety of Machinery – Interlocking Devices associated with      Guards – Principles for Design and Selection 15. ISO 14120: 2015 Safety of Machinery – Guards – General Requirements for       the Design and Construction of Fixed and Movable Guards 16. Directive 2006/42/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May       2006 on Machinery 17. UK HSE's "Providing and Using Work Equipment Safely – A Brief Guide"   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 8 May 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying any liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

Accident Advisory: Worker fell while working near a pump of a tank

21 May 2020
Ref No.: 210520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Advisory: Worker fell while working near a pump of a tank   21 May 2020, Ref: 2021121   Accident Advisory: Worker fell while working near a pump of a tank Ref: 2021003 WSH Alert Accident Notification dated 9 April 2020   On 1 April 2020, a worker was working near a pump of a tank when he slipped and fell. He was conveyed to a hospital where he succumbed to his injuries on 5 April.   Figure 1: The accident scene after spill clean-up.   Recommendations   Persons in control of workplaces and work activities such as occupiers, principals and employers are advised to consider the following risk control measures to prevent similar accidents:   Spill control • Construct a secondary containment facility at the base of each pump so that any    leaks or spills would be confined inside the containment area. Ideally, the    secondary containment facility should be provided with direct drainage to a sump. • Install a spillage tray under the hose to pump connection. The rate of drainage    can be considered in assigning a suitable dimension to the spillage tray. • Provide periodic supervision on site to ensure that there is no overflow    from spillage tray or secondary containment, arising from any choke or sudden    upsurge in the rate of drainage.   Emergency response • Establish an Emergency Response Plan and spill control procedure for    minor leak or spill scenario considering the nature of the material being released    (e.g. whether it is toxic or flammable). • Minor leaks or spills may be handled by trained personnel or the Company    Emergency Response Team. Prepare a suitable spill control kit for emergency    use. Contents of a typical spill control kit include (non-exhaustive):      - universal inert absorbents (e.g. absorbent booms, pads, pillows) for spill         containment      - adsorbents for solvent and hydrocarbon spills      - drain covers and caution tape      - whisk broom or handheld brush, plastic/metal scoops and dust pan      - leak-proof disposal bags or containers to hold the spilled material and        contaminated absorbents      - sealable impervious disposal container(s) • For major leaks, notify the Singapore Civil Defence Force and/or Police.   Preventive maintenance and leak prevention • Place all continuously operated equipment (including pumps) on a strict    preventive maintenance programme. • Replace pump connections (e.g. pipes, hoses, fittings) and pump seals on a    schedule recommended by the manufacturer or parts supplier depending on    your equipment use. • Routinely inspect all pumps during operation to check for leaks and other    operating anomalies. In particular, look for signs of leakage especially at pump    seals, fittings and suction/discharge valves. Resume work only after such leakage    is rectified. • Routinely carry out checks on all control valves to ensure that there are no    passing valves.   Safe Work Procedure (SWP) • Establish and implement a SWP for pump maintenance and clean-up of leaks    and spills. During pump maintenance, leakage is to be expected as the pump is    cleared of its contents and the follow-up clean-up activity must be planned for. • The SWP should incorporate steps to check that risk controls are in place and    provide guidance on the additional precautionary measures that should be taken. • Train workers on the SWP and conduct briefings on the on-site hazards and    possible risks associated with the task prior to work commencement.   Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) • Provide workers involved in clean-up operations with the necessary PPE e.g.    chemical protective clothing, safety footwear, chemical-resistant gloves, safety    goggles and respirator. • As leak or spill clean-up involves working on surfaces that may be more slippery    than usual due to floor contamination (e.g. due to release of oil or sludge), it    is important that workers be provided with non-slip safety footwear to prevent    slips and falls. • Place non-slip footwear on a regular inspection and replacement programme.    Such replacement programme should collect back the used footwear in exchange    for new one. This is so that the use of worn out footwear can be prevented,    thereby minimising the risk of slips and falls.   Worker health • Conduct a pre-work health survey at the start of each work shift to verify each    worker’s fitness to work for the task at hand. Workers who are feeling unwell    should not be placed on the task or work shift.   Risk Assessment   Conduct a holistic Risk Assessment (RA) to identify possible hazards associated with the work activity. The RA should cover all foreseeable risks but not limited to the following areas:   • Slip and fall hazards e.g. arising from possible floor contamination that could    arise during the course of work • Condition of anti-slip footwear provided • Adequacy of existing spill clean-up SWP for different material(s) being released • The need for active on-site task supervision   Further Information   1. Workplace Safety and Health Act 2. Workplace Safety and Health (Risk Management) Regulations 3. Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations 4. Code of Practice on Workplace Safety and Health Risk Management 5. Singapore Standard SS 513: 2013 Specification for Personal Protective     Equipment – Footwear      - Part 1: Safety Footwear      - Part 2: Test Methods for Footwear 6. PUB’s Code of Practice on Sewerage and Sanitary Works (2019) 7. SCDF Guidelines for Emergency Response Plan 8. SCDF Guidelines for Company Emergency Response Team 9. SCDF Evacuation Planning Guidelines 10. WSH Guidelines on Workplace Housekeeping 11. WSH Council’s 6 Basic WSH Rules to Prevent Slips, Trips and Falls 12. WSH Council’s Activity-Based Checklist on Slips, Trips and Falls 13. HSE’s Information Document on Risks from Sewage Sludge Drying Plants   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 14 May 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

Safe Hands Campaign 2020

19 May 2020
Ref No.: 190520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Safe Hands Campaign 2020   19 May 2020, Ref: 2021120   Safe Hands Campaign 2020   The Safe Hands Campaign 2020, led by Singapore Manufacturing Federation (SMF) and supported by the WSH Council, was telecast online on 19 May 2020. The Campaign was streamed through SMF’s Facebook page and YouTube channel.    This year’s Safe Hands Campaign continues to emphasise the risks of hand and finger injuries at workplaces, and how these injuries can impact the lives of workers due to amputations. The Campaign reinforces the importance of building a culture of prevention in the workplace so that everyone can work in a safe environment.   Stressing on the importance of keeping our hands and fingers safe, Dr Ahmad Magad, Secretary-General at SMF, shared a Chinese saying, which literally translates into “When our hands stop, the mouth stops”. He explains: “Losing our hands or even part of them may mean the end of our livelihood.” Emphasising that safety is in our hands, he urged employers and employees to play a part in preventing accidents in the workplace. “We need to make a commitment to avoid shortcuts, to avoid taking unnecessary risks and to look out for one another,” said Dr Magad.    The COVID-19 pandemic has also served as a reminder to all that companies must set aside time to care for their employees’ health as their health can have an impact on their safety at work and put themselves or their co-workers at risk of hand and finger injuries.    Mr Douglas Foo, Chairman of the WSH Council (Manufacturing) Committee, spoke about how people must protect themselves and their fellow workers, which goes beyond keeping themselves safe from hand and finger injuries “but also in the prevention of the formation of new virus clusters” at the workplaces. He encouraged “all employers to adopt the Safe Management Measures as advised by the Ministry of Manpower.” “To help companies implement these measures,” Mr Foo said, “the WSH Council has a variety of materials available in the form of simple infographics and pictograms. These include items such as basic rules for safe distancing and basic rules for workplace hygiene.”     Participate in the Safe Hands Campaign   Pledge your company’s commitment   A total of 284 companies have pledged their commitment towards preventing hand injuries and ensuring safer work processes. Companies who wish to pledge their commitment in the Safe Hands Campaign can visit the website here.   Download resources on machinery safety and other training materials   In support of the Safe Hands Campaign 2020, the WSH Council has also put together a set of Safe Hand kits available online for the manufacturing industry, specifically for the Metalworking, Food and Beverage manufacturing, and Woodworking sectors. These kits include materials, such as photo library on best practices for machine safety, guides on safe operation of machines, and case studies.   Download the resources on machinery safety from the Safe Hands Campaign 2020 webpage here.   Learn more about how to take care of your employees’ health at work from the National WSH Campaign microsite here.

MOM, NTUC and SNEF issue advisory for Safe Management Measures at the workplace after Circuit Breaker period

18 May 2020
Ref No.: 180520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, MOM, NTUC and SNEF issue advisory for Safe Management Measures at the workplace after Circuit Breaker period   18 May 2020, Ref: 2021118   Join the SMF Safe Hands Campaign and pledge to keep workers safe from hand injuries   As announced by the Ministry of Health (MOH) on 2 May 2020, Circuit Breaker measures will progressively ease over the coming weeks and selective economic activities will resume. To prevent the re-emergence of community cases, our workplaces should begin to put in place safe management measures ahead of time.   The tripartite partners – the Ministry of Manpower (MOM), National Trades Union Congress (NTUC) and Singapore National Employers Federation (SNEF) – have issued an Advisory on Safe Management Measures for companies which can resume their operations. The advisory guides companies on how to make safe management practices an integral part of operations, which includes proactively identifying situations and practices which have higher infection risks and implementing appropriate precautions and safeguards at the workplace.   Mr John Ng, Chairman of the WSH Council, says, “As companies begin to resume operations and work activities, we must bear in mind that the safety and health of our workers is paramount. I urge companies to adopt the measures recommended by the tripartite partners so that we can provide a safe working environment for our workers and minimise the risk of further COVID-19 outbreaks.”   MOM and the Ministry of Trade and Industry have produced an infographic describing the 6 mandatory steps on safe management measures at workplaces for employers when businesses reopen. Download the infographic here.   Read MOM’s Requirements for Safe Management Measures at the workplace after Circuit Breaker period here.   Read MOH’s announcement on easing Circuit Breaker measures here.

Accident Advisory: Worker struck by rudder and fell

18 May 2020
Ref No.: 180520 (2) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Advisory: Worker struck by rudder and fell   18 May 2020, Ref: 2021119   Accident Advisory: Worker struck by rudder and fell Ref: 1920110 WSH Alert Accident Notification dated 16 March 2020   On 11 March 2020, a group of workers was installing a rudder at the rear of a marine vessel when the rudder swung and hit one of them. The worker fell to the ground and was pronounced dead at the scene by attending paramedics.   Figure 1: Overview of the accident scene.   Recommendations   Persons in control of workplaces and work activities such as occupiers, principals and employers are advised to consider the following risk control measures to prevent similar accidents/incidents:   Regular equipment inspection and maintenance • All lifting equipment (including lifting machines, lifting appliances, hoists and    lifting gears) used must be subjected to statutory regular inspections by an    Authorised Examiner at least once every 12 months. • Place all lifting equipment on a preventive maintenance programme (in accordance    with manufacturer’s recommendations) to ensure that they remain in good    condition and ready for use. • Any defects found during inspection or pre-use checks must be reported to the     supervisor and properly documented, and the equipment should not be    used until the defects are repaired/rectified in accordance to the manufacturer's    recommendations.   Lifting plan and method of installation • Establish and implement a lifting and rigging plan before commencing the    lifting operation. The lifting plan should take into consideration the following key    elements (non-exhaustive):          - Details of load      - Details of the lifting/rigging equipment or lifting gears used      - Sketch of the lifting zone      - Physical and environment conditions      - Lifting sequence or special precautions      - Personnel involved in the lifting/rigging operations      - Means of communications • Ensure that a safe method for rudder installation has been determined prior to     work commencement taking into account the on-site risks. • Document the installation method in the Safe Work Procedure (SWP) and deploy    only competent workers who have been trained on the SWP.   Competent lifting crew • Ensure that lifting team members (lifting equipment operator, lifting supervisor,    rigger, signalman) are competent and have successfully completed the relevant    safety and health training (e.g. WSQ Supervise Safe Lifting Operations course for    lifting supervisors) in relation to their assigned roles and responsibilities.   Safe lifting operation • Ensure that the selected lifting equipment has sufficient lifting capacity and    reach to handle the intended load. • Ensure all lifting gears (e.g. slings, webbings, shackles, wire ropes and chains)    are within the Safe Working Load of the lift, in good condition and meet    the requirements stated in Regulation 20 of the WSH (General Provisions)    Regulations.  • Demarcate the lifting zone and ensure that no unauthorised persons enter the    zone while the lifting operation is in progress. • Always maintain the load's centre of gravity directly beneath the load line   (i.e. directly beneath the hook). Otherwise, the load may swing when it is lifted.   • Ensure that the load is secured, stable and balanced throughout the lifting    operation. • Confirm that all members of the lifting team are in a safe position before starting    the lifting operation. • Use tag lines to control the load while it is being manoeuvred.   Permit-to-work (PTW) for hazardous work at height situation • A PTW is mandatory for work at height situations where a person could fall from    a height of more than 3 metres. Such a PTW must meet the requirements set    out under the WSH (Work at Heights) Regulations 2013. The PTW ought    to include the following information and checks (non-exhaustive) by the    relevant competent persons to verify that conditions are safe before allowing the    work to proceed:      - Particulars of the personnel assigned to the work      - Description and location of the equipment or installation      - Description of the work to be carried out      - Measures taken to ensure that the equipment or installation has been          made safe      - Fall prevention measures in place such as edge protection and the use of         of a personal fall arrest system   Hazard awareness and risk communication • Prior to work commencement, workers must be briefed (e.g. during toolbox    meetings) on the possible on-site hazards and the safety precautions to be    taken when carrying out installation works and when working within a lifting zone. • Work coordination with and between the contractors who are present at the    same site is critical to ensure safe execution of the lifting operation. • Workers should be encouraged to report any unsafe work conditions observed    or near-miss incidents witnessed to their supervisor so that these may be    addressed before an accident occurs.   Risk Assessment   Conduct a thorough Risk Assessment (RA) for all work activities to control any foreseeable risk that may arise during rudder installation works. The RA should cover, but not limited to, the following areas:   • Selection of suitable lifting equipment for the load to be lifted • Condition of the lifting equipment • Method of installation • Risks that can arise during installation • Risk of falling from heights   Further Information   1. Workplace Safety and Health Act 2. Workplace Safety and Health (Risk Management) Regulations 3. Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations 4. Workplace Safety and Health (Operation of Cranes) Regulations 2011 5. Workplace Safety and Health (Work at Heights) Regulations 2013 6. Code of Practice on Workplace Safety and Health Risk Management 7. Code of Practice on Safe Lifting Operations in the Workplaces 8. Code of Practice for Working Safely at Heights 9. Singapore Standard SS 343: 2014 Specification for Lifting Gear – Part 1: Wire     rope slings, Part 2: Hooks, Part 3: Shackles  10. WSH Guidelines on Anchorage, Lifelines and Temporary Edge Protection Systems 11. WSH Guidelines on Personal Protective Equipment for Work at Heights 12. WSH Guidelines on Contractor Management 13. WSH Guidelines on Fatigue Management 14. WSH Council’s Case Studies on Accidents Involving Work at Heights 15. WSH Council’s Work at Heights Toolkit for Supervisors 16. WSH Council’s Guidebook for Lifting Supervisors 17. WSH Council’s Worker’s Safety Handbook for Lorry Crane Operator 18. WSH Council’s Worker’s Safety Handbook for Rigger and Signalman 19. WSH Council’s 6 Basic WSH Rules for Lifting Operations 20. WSH Council’s 6 Basic WSH Rules for Work at Heights 21. WSH Council’s Activity Based Checklist for Working Safely on Heights 22. Ministry of Manpower Examination and Testing Requirements for Statutory       Lifting Equipment   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 12 May 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

Accident Advisory: Worker fell from ladder

14 May 2020
Ref No.: 140520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Accident Advistory: Worker fell from ladder   14 May 2020, Ref: 2021117   Accident Advisory: Worker fell from ladder Ref: 1920108 WSH Alert Accident Notification dated 12 March 2020   On 6 March 2020, a renovation worker was at a private dwelling to patch the ceiling. He was later found on the floor lying on an A-frame ladder which had toppled. The worker was conveyed to the hospital where he passed away.   Figure 1: Scene of accident showing the toppled A-frame ladder.   Recommendations   Persons in control of similar workplaces and work activities such as employers, principals and contractors are advised to consider the following risk control measures to prevent similar accidents:   Select a good ladder • Provide ladders that are of good construction and structural integrity. The use of     ladders built according to Singapore Standard SS EN 131: 2019 Ladders (or any    other internationally recognised standard) is strongly recommended. • Ensure workers select ladders that are in good condition and fit for purpose.    Ladders that are damaged or contain loose or missing parts should never be used.    Workers must inform their supervisors whenever they spot any damaged ladder.   Safe use of ladders • Inspect the ladder for visible defects before each use. The ladder should also be    free from oil, grease and/or other slipping hazards. • Set up and use the ladder on firm, level and stable ground. Do not set up a ladder    near doorway or window. If you really need to use a ladder near one, lock the    door (except when it is a fire exit) or window. • Make sure the ladder used is of the correct height, so that the designated work    area can be accessed without the need to stand on the top rung of the ladder. • Check that the spreaders are locked in place prior to using the ladder. • Use proper footwear. • Always face the ladder and maintain three points of contact while using the    ladder. Consider the use of a tool belt or side pouch to contain any required tools    so that both hands can be kept free for ascending and descending the ladder.   Safe means of access • Consider the use of step platforms (see Figure 2) as these offer a more stable    work surface for safer access and work. Ladders serve primarily as means of    access to work areas and should only be used for low-risk and short-duration    tasks. Step ladders will allow workers to work safely for a longer duration.   Figure 2: Example of a step platform.   Risk Assessment   Employers, principals and contractors are required to conduct a thorough Risk Assessment (RA) to manage any foreseeable risk that may arise for all work activities that involve the use of ladders. The RA should address, but not limited to, the following areas:   Possibility of falling off a ladder Falling from a ladder can result in serious injuries (e.g. head injuries) that could be life-threatening. To prevent falls from a ladder, provide proper footwear, educate workers on the importance of three-point contact, and secure the ladder where possible (e.g. by securing the base of the ladder to prevent slipping and/or by tying the ladder to a suitable fixture).   Figure 3: Example showing a ladder tied to a fixture.   Worker's health condition Allow only workers who are fit for work and feeling well to use ladders.   Further Information   1. Workplace Safety and Health Act  2. Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations 3. Workplace Safety and Health (Work at Heights) Regulations 2013  4. Workplace Safety and Health (Construction) Regulations 2007 5. Workplace Safety and Health (Risk Management) Regulations 6. Code of Practice on Working Safely at Heights  7. Code of Practice on Workplace Safety and Health Risk Management 8. Singapore Standard SS EN 131: 2019 Ladders     – Part 1: Terms, types, functional sizes     – Part 2: Requirements, testing, marking     – Part 3: Marking and user instructions     – Part 4: Single or multiple hinge-joint ladders     – Part 6: Telescopic ladders     – Part 7: Mobile ladders with platform 9. WSH Council’s Ladder Safety Pack  10. WSH Council’s Activity Based Checklist on Safe Use of Ladders   Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 17 April 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying any liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

A Reminder to Join the SMF Safe Hands Campaign and pledge to keep workers safe from hand injuries

12 May 2020
Ref No.: 120520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Join the SMF Safe Hands Campaign and pledge to keep workers safe from hand injuries   12 May 2020, Ref: 2021116   Join the SMF Safe Hands Campaign and pledge to keep workers safe from hand injuries   The Safe Hands Campaign 2020, led by the Singapore Manufacturing Federation (SMF) and supported by the WSH Council, will be launched on 19 May 2020. The Campaign seeks to raise awareness on machinery safety and the impact on the lives of workers due to amputations from hand and finger injuries.    The event will be streamed live on SMF's YouTube and Facebook page.   Date:    19 May 2020 (Tuesday)      Time:    3:00pm - 3:30pm    As hand and finger injuries affect the livelihoods of workers whose jobs rely on operating machinery or handling materials, it is crucial that employers recognise the importance of machine safety in the workplace. Join SMF and WSH Council by pledging your commitment in enforcing safer work processes so as to prevent hand and finger injuries for your workers.   Companies that pledged their commitment will be featured on the Safe Hands Live Stream on Tuesday, 19 May 2020.    Pledge your commitment here.

First Quarter 2020 National WSH Statistics

11 May 2020
Ref No.: 110520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, First Quarter 2020 National WSH Statistics   11 May 2020, Ref: 2021115 First Quarter 2020 National WSH Statistics   The first quarter of 2020 (1Q 2020) saw fewer fatalities, injuries and occupational diseases compared to 4Q 2019. The 12-month rolling fatal injury rate per 100,000 workers, however, saw an increase from 1.1 in 4Q 2019 to 1.2 in 1Q 2020, given more fatal injuries in the past 6 months than in the first 6 months of 2019.   The Construction sector and Transportation and Storage sector were the top contributing sectors to the 12 fatal injuries in 1Q 2020, with 3 cases each. The Construction sector was also the top contributing sector for major injuries with 21 cases, followed by the Manufacturing sector with 20 cases.   With the circuit breaker, we should not be complacent over the fewer injuries in 1Q 2020 compared to 4Q 2019. In addition, some industries will experience a sustained level of work activity, for example, food delivery and grocery logistics. The Ministry of Manpower (MOM) has worked with the Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Council to issue a notification on 17 April to essential firms to monitor job frequency to prevent rushing, and to remind drivers/riders to pay attention to road safety, in addition to safe distancing when fulfilling deliveries.   Slips, Trips and Falls, Falls from Height, Machinery Incidents and Vehicular Incidents remained as the top causes for fatal and major injuries in 1Q 2020. MOM will continue to focus the efforts on these hotspots.   The number of occupational diseases also reduced from 121 cases in 4Q 2019 to 111 cases in 1Q 2020. The top three occupational diseases - Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorder, Noise Induced Deafness and Occupational Skin Disease - contributed to approximately 94% of the occupational diseases.   MOM and the WSH Council urge all stakeholders to stay vigilant, especially as more workplaces resume operations in the coming weeks.   View the full report and infographic poster here.

2-month extension for Mandatory Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) audits that expired between 7 April 2020 and 15 June 2020

06 May 2020
Ref No.: 060520 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, 2-month extension for Mandatory Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) audits that expired between 7 April 2020 and 15 June 2020   6 May 2020, Ref: 2021114 2-month extension for Mandatory Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) audits that expired between 7 April 2020 and 15 June 2020   In view of the extension to the Circuit Breaker (CB) period, and considering that companies may face challenges in making arrangements for mandatory SHMS audits shortly after the CB period, the Ministry of Manpower will grant a 2-month extension to the expiry date of SHMS audits that expired between 7 April 2020 and 15 June 2020 inclusively. The Singapore Accreditation Council’s accredited Auditing Organisations that are performing the mandatory SHMS and risk management (RM) audits are to note that:   • Mandatory SHMS audits will be suspended until 1 June 2020; and • bizSAFE companies can write to WSH Council for an extension and it will be assessed     on a case-by-case basis.   WSH Council curated photo library on best practices for machinery safety    Amputations remained the second highest type of major injuries at the workplace over the last five years. However, they are often overlooked even though there is about one amputation case every three days. As most of amputation injuries involve the use of machinery, the WSH Council has curated a photo library depicting some of the best practices on Machinery Safety for industry cross-sharing and learning. Contributed by numerous manufacturing companies, these photos showcase machines commonly used in the Metalworking, Food & Beverage Manufacturing and Woodworking sectors, and their practical safety features, to prevent amputation. We trust that together we could eliminate or reduce the number of amputation cases moving forward.    Figures 1 to 3: Some of the best practices on Machinery Safety include installing safety guards and covers for machines with bandsaws and other cutting edges.   Download the photo library on machinery safety for your company here.  

Accident Advisory: Cleaner found lying at staircase landing

30 Apr 2020
Ref No.: 300420 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members,   Accident Advisory: Cleaner found lying at staircase landing     30 April 2020, Ref: 2021013   Ref: 2021001 WSH Alert Accident Notification dated 7 April 2020   On 28 March 2020, a cleaner was found lying on the staircase landing of a residential building with his cleaning equipment nearby. The injured cleaner was conveyed to the hospital where he passed away the following morning.                                                  Figure 1: Overview of the accident scene.   RECOMMENDATIONS Persons in control of similar workplaces and work activities such as employers, principals and contractors are advised to consider the following risk control measures to prevent similar accidents:   Safe work environment • Ensure staircases and staircase landings are sufficiently illuminated. Defective    lightings should be replaced immediately. • Highlight the edge of steps (and slopes) to increase their visibility, for example,    by painting with anti-slip paint or applying anti-slip tape.  • Equip wider staircases with handrails on both the left and right sides of the    staircase. For very wide staircases, consider installing additional handrails in the    middle of the staircase. • Encourage workers to report to their supervisors once they encounter unsafe    work conditions.   Safe Work Procedure (SWP)   • Brief workers on possible on-site hazards, associated risks and control measures    prior to starting work. • Check that workers are familiar with the SWP for working at staircases. • Place signs or stickers at staircases to remind staircase users on the importance    of using handrails to prevent falls.   Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)   • Provide workers with footwear that is suitable for the location of work, such as    non-slip shoes. • Conduct checks to ensure that workers put on the provided footwear while    at work. • Place all company-issued footwear on a regular inspection and replacement    programme..   RISK ASSESSMENTS Employers, principals and contractors are required to conduct a thorough Risk Assessment (RA) for all cleaning activities at work premises to manage any foreseeable risk that may arise. The RA should address, but not limited to, the following areas:   Ground condition Assess the ground condition at the designated work area for slip, trip and fall hazards, and look out for locations where one may easily lose balance (e.g. if workers are required to work on steps or sloping surfaces). Highlight these hazards to the worker and advise on the SWP.   Worker Health   Consider the health condition of the worker to ensure that is sufficiently fit for the physical demands of the assigned task. Ensure workers have enough rest as fatigue can reduce one's alertness to hazards in the work environment.     FURTHER INFORMATION 1. Workplace Safety and Health Act  2. Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations 3. Workplace Safety and Health (Risk Management) Regulations 4. Code of Practice on Workplace Safety and Health Risk Management 5. WSH Council’s Guide to Workplace Safety and Health (p/19-21) 6. WSH Guidelines on Cleaning and Custodial Services  7. WSH Guidelines on Workplace Housekeeping 8. Singapore Standard SS 485: 2011 Specification for Slip Resistance Classification     of Pedestrian Surface Materials 9. Singapore Standard SS 513: 2013 Specification for Personal Protective Equipment     – Footwear – Part 1: Safety Footwear; Part 2: Test Methods for Footwear 10. Singapore Standard SS 531: 2006 (2019) Code of Practice for Lighting of Work       Places – Part 1: Indoor 11. Singapore Standard SS 531: 2008 (2019) Code of Practice for Lighting of Work       Places – Part 2: Outdoor 12. WSH Council’s Activity-Based Checklist for Slips, Trips and Falls 13. WSH Council’s WSH Checklist for Facilities Management 14. WSH Council’s 6 Basic WSH Rules to prevent Slips, Trips and Falls   *Information on the accident is based on preliminary investigations by the Ministry of Manpower as at 15 April 2020. This may be subject to change as investigations are still on-going. Please also note that the recommendations provided here are not exhaustive and they are meant to enhance workplace safety and health so that a recurrence may be prevented. The information and recommendations provided are not to be construed as implying any liability on any party nor should it be taken to encapsulate all the responsibilities and obligations under the law.

Join the SMF Safe Hands Campaign and pledge to keep workers safe from hand injuries

28 Apr 2020
Ref No.: 280420 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, Join the SMF Safe Hands Campaign and pledge to keep workers safe from hand injuries   28 April 2020, Ref: 2021112 Join the SMF Safe Hands Campaign and pledge to keep workers safe from hand injuries   Singapore Manufacturing Federation (SMF), supported by the WSH Council, will be launching the Safe Hands Campaign 2020 for the Manufacturing sectors on 19 May 2020. The Campaign seeks to raise awareness on machinery safety and the impact on the lives of workers due to amputations from hand and finger injuries.    The event will be streamed live on SMF's YouTube and Facebook page   Date:     19 May 2020 (Tuesday)      Time:    3:00pm - 3:30pm    As hand and finger injuries affect the livelihoods of workers whose jobs rely on operating machinery or handling materials, it is crucial that employers recognise the importance of machine safety in the workplace. Join SMF and WSH Council by pledging your commitment in enforcing safer work processes so as to prevent hand and finger injuries for your workers.   Companies that pledged their commitment will be featured on the Safe Hands Live Stream on Tuesday, 19 May 2020. Pledge your commitment here.

National WSH Campaign 2020

27 Apr 2020
Ref No.: 270420 (1) UEN: S97SS0046G   Dear Valued ASPRI Members, National WSH Campaign 2020   27 April 2020, Ref: 2021011 National WSH Campaign 2020   The WSH Council together with the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) and our Tripartite partners from the National Trades Union Congress (NTUC) and Singapore National Employers Federation (SNEF) kick-started this year’s National Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Campaign on the WSH Council’s Facebook on 27 April 2020.   The opening of the Campaign, comprising a series of video posts, featured the welcome remarks by Mr John Ng, Chairman of the WSH Council, and the opening remarks by Mr Zaqy Mohamad, Minister of State for Manpower. Various campaign messages and activities were also posted on the Facebook page.   The year’s Campaign calls upon the industry, employers and employees to “Take Time to Take Care” of their safety and health at work. The emphasis is for everyone to set aside time to care for their health so as to build a safer and healthier workforce at the workplace.     Mr John Ng, Chairman of the WSH Council, said, “I cannot emphasise enough the importance of health.” He added that, “For many of us, COVID-19 has hit us hard. It reminds us that we should take health matters seriously. We have a contracting workforce due to a lower birth rate and many of us desire to work longer. And for this aging workforce to continue to be productive, we must remain healthy. That’s why we urge both companies and workers to embrace Total WSH, as a shared responsibility that reaps mutual benefits.”   Mr Zaqy Mohamad, Minister of State for Manpower, resonates with Chairman’s remarks and shared three ways on improving WSH during this difficult time. Firstly, the Industry can focus on workers’ health. Secondly, the Industry can review and improve their WSH systems and processes. MOS Zaqy said, “With the closure of non-essential workplaces, this is also an opportune time for workers to acquire new WSH skills through training. Tap on the WSH Council’s many training materials and e-learning platforms. By doing so, your workers can be better prepared to meet work demands when operations resume at workplaces.” Thirdly, the Industry can leverage technology to improve WSH performance.     Watch the speech by Mr Zaqy Mohamad, Minister of State for Manpower here.   Watch the speech by Mr John Ng, Chairman of the WSH Council here.   Participate in the National WSH Campaign 2020   Learn from various health topics on Campaign microsite to improve health and safety at work   The WSH Council has created a Campaign microsite with information catered for both employers and employees.    Employers can download and share the Campaign CARE kit with their employees.The kit comes with educational health messages, health tips, and other useful resources. They can adopt the suggested actions to improve employees’ health, and learn about disease and lifestyle management. Employees can learn about the various health risks in the workplace, take part in the Campaign quiz to discover their persona and receive tips on how they can improve their health and lifestyle habits.   Download WSH Training Materials on Common Hazards in the Workplace   The WSH Council has prepared a series of pictorial training slides to address common workplace hazards. Employers can download the WSH training slides to share with their employees. Employers can also download the new safe distancing poster to facilitate training for their employees. Download the slides here. Download the Safe Distancing Pictogram Poster here.
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